Authors protest Amazon’s e-book return policy
A new option for copyright disputes
Freelance is no longer free
That’s one way to research a murder mystery
Bessie Arrowood’s Circle of Life

Bessie Arrowood’s Circle of Life

by Karen Paul Holmes
There she goes again, spinning / her wheelchair ’round the nursing home. / Two years, five thousand laps. So far.
Goldfish

Goldfish

by Lisa Cihlar
Does it matter that a migrating tern / is standing in the Fox River / with a goldfish in its beak? / The tern is a Caspian with a lovely black head / like the back-combed Italian mobsters in old movies.
This Isn’t Silverlake Anymore

This Isn’t Silverlake Anymore

by Neil McCarthy
I hear the slightly scratched voice of Joan Baez coming from / the record player singing about the junipers in the pale moonlight, / applause erupting like hailstones on a corrugated iron roof.
Hearsay

Hearsay

by Carla Ferreira
They say in Avignon people dance on the bridge / that was either unfinished or fell apart— / no one remembers those folk stories anymore.
Last Time at the Arch Street Tavern

Last Time at the Arch Street Tavern

by Gail C. DiMaggio
Another Monday in another February and the streets outside / are shiny with sleet, speckled with litter. Everything / diminishes—sumac and elm, Dad’s old Buick. Lust.
The Reincarnation of the Seagull

The Reincarnation of the Seagull

by Lisa Pellegrini
Before he was a seagull / he was the bed of the ocean / its stronghold and place of / penance, a tenderfoot of sorts.
Watching Snow Falling in a Mirror

Watching Snow Falling in a Mirror

by Timothy Walsh
From where I sit, the mirror on the opposite wall / shows the outside world / through the window behind me.
How We Made Gravity About Us

How We Made Gravity About Us

by Matthew J. Robinson
Although we died the moment we met, / we believed we could shun nothingness / by getting married, act as a paradigm / for those just beyond giving up.
Quiescent Infinite

Quiescent Infinite

by Hélène Cardona
On a visit to my ancestors I’m shown / into the palace of hypnotists / through a small entrance and grand rounding staircase, / each step a drawer containing sculptures.
Four by Rilke

Four by Rilke

translated by Len Krisak
Rainer Maria Rilke (1875-1926) is one of the most influential poets in German literature. Following are new translations of four of Rilke’s poems from his 1907 work Neue Gedichte.
It all began around a campfire…

Beautiful language

is meant to be heard as well as read, and in fact words were vocalized eons before they were ever committed to clay or parchment. Storytelling began around campfires. We seek prose and poetry that continue the tradition.

Contributor Spotlight:

by Judith Waller Carroll

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Best Writing Contests of 2022, recommended by Reedsy

Lascaux Vol 9

by Stephen Parrish, with the editors of The Lascaux Review